A levitating origami roof creates a strong first impression for the visitor who arrives from the north to the landmark historical site of the Domkirkeodden Museum. Reminiscent of the traditional timber roofs of Nordic climate zones, yet contemporary in its form, the proposed extension’s vast and expressive roof acts as a marker in the landscape—a marker that signifies its function as a threshold towards the cultural facilities in Domkirkeodden.

The scattered character of the built environment at Domkirkeodden demands a critical awareness of how significant the in-between spaces between buildings are in shaping the overall experience of the park. A crucial component of our proposal, therefore, is the Plaza that will be shared between the proposed extension and Storhamalaven and Hamardomen. This Plaza will help to integrate the new and old museums into a cohesive whole, acting as a new outdoor public space that ties the urban fabric to the north of the site with the cultural facilities to the south. This happens as the new museum funnels visitors through it and out it, through the southern corner that opens out towards the old museums.

Our design strategy is to make a roof aggregation that responds, with its undulating forms, to the widely varying scales of the surrounding buildings. The roof serves as a guide that directs one gaze to another, as it transfigures like origami to respond to sightlines. Made in copper, it sits atop a light structure made of wood and glass. The entire ensemble alludes to an aesthetic blend between the visual transparency of the Hamardomen and the warm textural quality of wood that characterizes Storhamalaven.

The proposed extension also functions as a threshold between the Park to the west and the Plaza, with a semi-open space under the roof allowing for a seamless integration between the indoor and outdoor spaces. Penetrating throughout the building’s central axis is a sky-lit linear public space, which can serve as both a temporary gallery space or as a multifunctional space for hosting events.

The museum circulation is organized as an interactive and linear loop that culminates in a cafeteria and museum shop that overlook the park to the west—both of which together form a hub that acts as a pause point on the pilgrims’ route

credits

architect: Studio MADe  |  team: Madhusudhan Chalasani, Mario Yáñez, Jesús Garrido, Javier Ugarte, Vamsi Krishna, Bharat Thota, Bob Peniel, Niharika Sanyal, Carlos Gonzalvo  |  client: Unknown  |  status: Competition (2021)  |  competition: Hamar domkirkeodden Museum  |  location: Hamar, Norway (60.793015, 11.038597)  |  climate: Continental, Temperate  |  material: wood  |  environment: Riverside  |  visualizer: Beta Collective  |  scale: medium  |  types: cultural, museum  |  views: 310

same competition (+1)

Studio MADe | LABORATOIRE, Ludovic Gaffarel